Unit 1 Sample_ Persuasive_ Essay

Unit 1 Sample_ Persuasive_ Essay - Parents, Coaches, and...

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Parents, Coaches, and Kids’ Sports 1 Curbing Parental Sports Rage Parental and Coach Conduct at Youth Sporting Events Maggie Durham CM102-75 3111_wl_wp_dft65.doc Page 1 of 8
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Parents, Coaches, and Kids’ Sports 2 Curbing Parental Sports Rage: Parental and Coach Conduct at Youth Sporting Events A child’s world is full of violence. It appears in video games, films, and TV programs, and many parents in the hope of removing their children from some of this violence are encouraging and sometimes pushing their children into participating in organized sports. Unfortunately, this same violence is creeping into Little League, Pee Wee football, soccer, basketball, and hockey, in the form of the parents’ and coaches’ poor conduct and rage. This violent behavior on the part of parents and coaches must be curbed and we must bring back into the game the learning of the rules and skills of the sport and a sense of good sportsmanship and values. Some parents are losing sight of why these children are playing--and that to the children is what they are doing: “playing.” Many parents come to their child’s practice or game with their own agenda of win, win, win at all costs. The team winning, the points scored, who is the big scorer: these are the issues that have replaced fun and sportsmanship in the eyes of these parents. These unreasonable expectations of winning, not messing up, being the star player, and making mom and/or dad proud are everything. “These parents expect perfection from their children, the coaches and the referees” (Sachs, 2000, p.62). It no longer is for the kids. Maybe Mom or Dad were promising athletes in their youth and for one reason or another were robbed of their hopes and are pinning all of their own wants, needs, wishes, and “what ifs” on their child or children (Kehe, 2000). The major problem seems to be that these parents are not considering what the children want. According to a “Kidthink” survey conducted by Jerry 3111_wl_wp_dft65.doc Page 2 of 8
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Parents, Coaches, and Kids’ Sports 3 Kirshenbaum (1993) for Sports Illustrated, the kids want things like “unlimited free throws until they miss in basketball, everyone having a turn to play, less violence in hockey, using their hands in soccer, and to have fun” (p.12). Perhaps the parents should listen to the children on this issue. Originally, the purpose of organized sports for young children was to teach them the basics of the game and skills needed to play, to practice good sportsmanship, and to have fun. If we look back to the beginnings of organized sports over 100 years ago, the purpose then was to get the growing numbers of rowdy children off the streets and to teach them values (Nack & Munson, 2000). Joe Fish, director of the Center for Sports Psychology in Philadelphia adds to this stating, “The main purpose of youth sports is to
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This note was uploaded on 01/01/2012 for the course WRITING BU 481 taught by Professor Theodorealex during the Winter '11 term at Kaplan University.

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Unit 1 Sample_ Persuasive_ Essay - Parents, Coaches, and...

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