Unit 2 Avoiding Plagiarism

Unit 2 Avoiding Plagiarism - Avoiding Plagiarism Diana...

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Avoiding Plagiarism Diana Hacker, editor of The Bedford Handbook , reminds her readers that "three different acts are considered plagiarism: (1) failing to cite quotations and borrowed ideas, (2) failing to enclose borrowed language in quotation marks, and (3) failing to put summaries and paraphrases in your own words" (570). Failing to Cite : to avoid this type of plagiarism, use parenthetical citations to document direct quotations and to indicate any reference to ideas that come from anyone but you. Exception: there is no need to cite common knowledge. To determine whether information constitutes common knowledge, look for that same information in other sources: if you find it in three or more sources, it is likely common knowledge. It is wise, however, to cite your source whenever you're in doubt. Failing to Quote: to avoid this type of plagiarism, use quotation marks any time you employ someone else's language—wording or phrasing. Even if you cite your source, failure to employ quotation marks around borrowed language constitutes plagiarism.
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Unit 2 Avoiding Plagiarism - Avoiding Plagiarism Diana...

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