geneitcs unit exam - Questions 5356 The common fruit...

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Questions 53–56 The common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is usually found with red eyes and normal wings. A series of experimental crosses were run to examine their recessive traits: white eyes and vestigial (shrunken) wings. In the F0 generation, a female with red eyes and normal wings was crossed with a male having white eyes and vestigial wings. The results are given below. 53. Based on the data, which of these characteristics is sex-linked in fruit flies? (A) Wing shape (B) Eye color (C) Vestigial wings (D) Red eyes (E) All of the above 54. What is the likelihood of observing female offspring with white eyes and vestigial wings in the F3 generation?
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55. What is the ratio of phenotypes in F2 males? 56. If the allele for white eyes was dominant, approximately how many F2 males would have white eyes (out of a possible 160 males)? Questions 57–60 An experimenter was testing the effects of temperature on egg production and hatching rates in fruit flies. She kept separate communities of 50 fruit flies at different temperatures, counting the eggs produced and hatchlings for each day of the experiment.
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57. According to this data, the experimenter can conclude fertility rates of fruit flies are highest at temperatures near (A) 5º (B) 15º (C) 30º (D) 40º (E) 50º 58. The majority of egg production occurs between days
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59. This graph best represents the experiment at 60. Constructing a hypothesis about fertility rates for fruit flies at different temperatures could be strengthened by Modern Explanation of Mendel’s Results With our modern understanding of genes, chromosomes, and cellular reproduction, we can explain  the biological basis of Mendel’s observations and make pretty accurate predictions about the offspring  that any given cross (short for crossbreeding) will produce.
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Alleles Each of the traits that Mendel observed in his pea plants came in one of two varieties; modern science  calls any gene that gives rise to more than one version of the same trait an allele. So, for example, the  tall gene and the short gene are different alleles (variations) of the height gene.
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