Lecture7CHM233(10)final

Lecture7CHM233(10)final - Organic Chemistry, Third Edition...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
! Organic Chemistry, Third Edition Janice Gorzynski Smith University of Hawai’i Chapter 4 Alkanes
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Which of the following compounds should have dipole- dipole interactions? #$ ##$ O H 3 C Cl N H A B C D E
Background image of page 2
The indicated carbon atom is A) Nucleophilic because it is electron-rich. B) Electrophilic because it is electron-rich. C) Nucleophilic because it is electron-deficient. D) Electrophilic because it is electron-deficient.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
, The suffix “-ane” identifies a molecule as an alkane. Naming Alkanes C n H 2n +2
Background image of page 4
- Cycloalkanes have molecular formula C n H 2n and contain carbon atoms arranged in a ring. Simple cycloalkanes are named by adding the prefix cyclo- to the name of the acyclic alkane having the same number of carbons. Cycloalkanes
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
. The name of every organic molecule has 3 parts: 1. The parent name indicates the number of carbons in the longest continuous chain. 2. The prefix tells us the identity, location, and number of substituents attached to the carbon chain. 3. The suffix indicates what functional group is present. Nomenclature
Background image of page 6
/ Carbon substituents bonded to a long carbon chain are called alkyl groups. An alkyl group is formed by removing one H atom from an alkane. To name an alkyl group, change the –ane ending of the parent alkane to –yl . Thus, methane (CH 4 ) becomes methyl (CH 3 –) and ethane (CH 3 CH 3 ) becomes ethyl (CH 3 CH 2 –). Alkyl Groups
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
0 Naming three- or four-carbon alkyl groups is more complicated because the parent hydrocarbons have more than one type of hydrogen atom. For example, propane has both 1° and 2° H atoms, and removal of each of these H atoms forms a different alkyl group with a different name, propyl or isopropyl. Naming Three Carbon Alkyl Groups
Background image of page 8
1 Step [1] Find the parent (longest continuous carbon chain) and add the suffix (ane). 2 It does not matter if the chain is straight or it bends. Naming Using the IUPAC System
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
!3 If there are two chains of equal length, pick the chain with more substituents. In the following example, two different chains in the same alkane have seven C atoms. We circle the longest continuous chain as
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 45

Lecture7CHM233(10)final - Organic Chemistry, Third Edition...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online