Lecture17CHM233(10)final

Lecture17CHM233(10)final - Organic Chemistry, Third Edition...

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1 Organic Chemistry, Third Edition Janice Gorzynski Smith University of Hawai’i Chapter 14
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2 Chemically equivalent protons: are protons in the same chemical environment. Each set of chemically equivalent protons in a compound gives rise to a signal in an 1 H NMR spectrum of that compound. 1 H NMR
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3 Figure 14.5 Regions in the 1 H NMR Spectrum
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4 The area under an NMR signal is proportional to the number of absorbing protons. An NMR spectrometer automatically integrates the area under the peaks, and prints out a stepped curve ( integral ) on the spectrum. Intensity of 1 H NMR Signals
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5 1 H NMR Integration NMR spectrometers automatically calculate and plot the value of each integral in arbitrary units. The ratio of integrals to one another gives the ratio of absorbing protons in a spectrum. Note that this gives a ratio, and not the absolute number, of absorbing protons.
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6 How many hydrogens ? When the molecular formula is known, each integral rise can be assigned to a particular number of hydrogens.
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7
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What is the ratio of the protons in the following compound (as can be seen by the integration of 1 H NMR)? A. 3:3:2:2 B. 3:1:1 C. 6:2:1 D. 3:2:1 E. 6:4 C CH 2 CH 2 Br CH 3 CH 3 Br
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9 1 H NMR—Spin-Spin Splitting The spectra up to this point have been limited to single absorptions called singlets.
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Lecture17CHM233(10)final - Organic Chemistry, Third Edition...

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