Class 7 presentation 2011 - 455 a ppendix a: schema...

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Unformatted text preview: 455 a ppendix a: schema prototypes The Prinner The Prinner (see chap. 3) was often used as the riposte or answer to an opening gambit. Its period of greatest currency was the 1720s to the 1770s, though it remained an option throughout the century. The presence of a Prinner riposte is one of the best indications of a musical style grounded in the Italian galant. Strong z 5 3 4 Weak y 6 3 3 Strong v x Weak w 7-6 3 5 3 2 1 5 Robert Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007), 455 5 3 6 4 3 6 3 6 3 5 3 #6 4 3 6 3 5 3 1 2345678 f igu r e b .3 A second approximation—the Rule descending The Prinner’s derivation from the upper tetrachord of the Rule of the Octave (descending) e x . 3. 2 Wodiczka, Opus 1, no. 3, mvt. 1, Adagio, m. 1 (1739) Prinner Romanesca #4 &4 1 ? #4 4 y y X. E u 48 e x . 3. 4 XXXXX 7 6 3 b4 &4 4 ?b 4 w X. X XXX XX 6 77 5 43 2 1 m usic in the galant style Marcello, Opus 1, no. 1, mvt. 1, Largo, m. 1 (Amsterdam, 1732) Prinner Romanesca 1 zyx £ jX X XXXX X« XX X aJ X X XXXXX X XX 1 u y u y zy x . X X @ X X X X X X« X a XX X X X. X X X J Xvwxyz{X 234567 X X . X X X1 XXX X u u 1 7 6 3 w 5 43 21 from the Corelli orbit seems not to have t aken students. He had already left Italy in the late 1720s for work in the north, centering on Amsterdam: e x . 3. 6 Locatelli, Opus 6, no. 11, mvt. 1, Adagio, m. 16 (Amsterdam, 1737) Prinner Romanesca u bb 4 &4 16 ? b4 b4 y zy x «. «w X @ X X X X X X X X @X X X X X b X X XX X X . bX X bX X X X X X XX y 1 y 7 6 3 43 2 51 The above example is actually a later restatement of the initial, more playful theme (see ex. 3.7). Locatelli begins his Prinner, then halts, and then begins it again. Though only hinted at here, in later decades it became common to separate – from – : e x . 3.7 Locatelli, Opus 6, no. 11, mvt. 1, Adagio, m. 1 (Amsterdam, 1737) Pr in . . . Romanesca u 1 bb 4 &4 ? b4 b4 y zy Prinner y zyx «w «. X X @X X X X X X X @ X X X X X @ X X X X X b X X X X X X X . bX X X bX X . X X X X X X X X X y y 17 6 3 43 3 43 21 5 of galant composers. The following passage from the slow movement of his flute concerto in G major could have served Wodiczka as a model for a slow, stately Presentation: prinner Romanesca e x . 3. 8 Leo, Concerto in G Major for Flute,uvt. 2, Largo (Naples, ca. 1730s) m z # 12 u &8X #2 u 18 X # 12? X . y Romanesca X XX . X J j XX X X X yX X X X J J .J X . XX X X. j X u yx w X PXrXinXnerX XX J X z yx jX j X w X X X. X JX XJ X X X X J X XX XXXX X X J j J j1 X X X X 8XX X & 7 5 634 32 1 X XX XX XX X X X # 18 J 2 JJ J J X jX j X X X X and whoever servedJas his “most X ? Whatever the specific pieces that Wodiczka learned, 1 7 wise maestro,” he obviously absorbed what was happening in Italian music of the 1730s. If these examples sound vaguely familiar, it is probably because many modern listeners have heard the work of Wodiczka’s contemporary Domenico Gallo (fl. 1750s) in the famous retouching by Stravinsky for the Ballets Russes (Pulcinella, overture, mm. 1–2): 6 3 5 43 2 1 Whatever the specific pieces that Wodiczka learned, and whoever served as his “most e x . 3. 9 Gallo, Trio in G Major, mvt. 1, Allegro, m. 1 (ca. 1750s) wise maestro,” he obviously absorbed what was happening in Italian music of the 1730s. If these examples sound vaguely familiar, it is probably because mrinner listeners have Pany modern Romanesca heard the work of Wodiczka’s contemporary Domenico Gallo (fl. 1750s) in the famous retouching by Stravinsky for the Balletsu Russes (Pulcinella, overture, mm. 1–2): 1 1 y y zyx m # 4 a Gallo, Trio. in G Major,Xmvt.X1, AXllegro, X . 1 (ca. 1750s) X« X a X X. X X XX XJ j X J Prinner &4 Romanesca X XuXX X X #4 ¥ XXXX J J z yX X ?4 y y x e x . 3. 9 u #4 a . X X X X X X6 X X J j 4 X J & XX #4 u 1 7 w X 4 . 3«2 X1 a X XX w 5 X with Wodiczka’s second melody. Though written more than four decades apart, the two fragments fit perfectly because both musicians knew the same “compulsory figures”: e x . 3.1 0 ## C & 1 A Paisiello partimento bass (1782) with a Wodiczka violin melody (1739) w Wodiczka ? ## C w Paisiello «E XX X X D E X w w w X £ X X X« X X JE X X X. EEEE The speed and confidence with which many of the best eighteenth-century composers wrote multivoice works has long been a subject of marvel for modern musicians. Though the skill and invention of those composers remains impressive however one might try to explain their abilities, there are obvious advantages that a stockpile of “interchangeable parts” would give to the rapid, secure crafting of complex compositions. Anyone who knew the above tradition of a Romanesca leading to a Prinner could draw upon a number of stock melodies, basses, and harmonizations—everything would fit together. Today we tend to equate “compose” with “invent,” yet the older, more literal meaning of “put together” (com + posare) may provide a better image of galant practice. Ew E E Mozart, Piano Sonata in C major, K. 545, first movement (1788) Mozart, Piano Sonata in C major, K. 545, first movement (1788) 54 m usic in the galant style Handel, Suite in G Major, Courante, m. 1 (before 1720) e x . 3.15 Do-Re-Mi u «. X #3 X &4J y ? X #3 a 4 1 v w u XXXXXX XXXXXX Romanesca XX X XXXXXX XX E 7 6 X 3 X E 5 4 E. 1 Prinner x #X X X X X X X X «. X X X X XX XX XX X X X X X X X X X X XX X X X & X X X X X XX X XX X XX # ¥ X X E. ¥ X X X aX XX ? z y 5 5 4 7 3 6 2 5 w X J X J 1 “Well-established maestros” t aught these same combinations of schemata. The Naplestrained castrato Giuseppe Aprile (1732–1813) gave his students the following solfeggio. It opens with a Romanesca and Do-Re-Mi that lead into a canonic, non-modulating Prinner. The downward scalar motion of the canonic Prinner extends to a half cadence: e x . 3.1 6 Aprile, Solfeggi per voce di soprano, fol. 4v, m. 1 (Paris, 1763) Isabelle de Charrière, as we read earlier, was a courtier who knew how to judge a riposte. As an amateur composer of keyboard sonatas, she wrote an opening gambit for which she provided an emphatic riposte of two Prinners :7 e x . 3.18 1790s) De Charrière, Sonata in D Major, mvt. 1, Allegro, m. 1 (The Hague, ca. ( Opening gambit ) & ? ## c E ## c E ## E ? E Triadic flourish XX XX X ¥X D E cadence XXXX Prinner w Xx ¥ X& E ¥X X .. j E XE X E XX 4 3 ## X X X X X X X X X X X X X #X X X X X X X X X X X X X ?X X X X X5 X 1 5 z ## E &E 9 z ¥X X E E ¥ XXXXX E XX X? XXX XXX XXX X X X y y E E Prinner ¥X X x X .. X w D jE XE X 4 3 ## X X X X X X X X X X X X X #X X X X X X X X ¥ X X ?X X X X X 1X E E 5 Handel, Chaconne in G major, HWV 435 (1733) Handel, Chaconne in G major, HWV 436 (1733) Handel, Chaconne in G major, HWV 436 (1733) Handel, Chaconne in G major, HWV 436 (1733) Handel, Chaconne in G major, HWV 436 (1733) Handel, Chaconne in G major, HWV 436 (1733) J. S. Bach, Aria from “Goldberg” Variations, 1741 Chaconne { #3 ™ &4˙ ? #3 ˙ ™ 4 Music 2101 ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ Copyright © 2010 Music 2101 ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ˙™ ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course MUSIC 2101 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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