Class 19 presentation 2011 - L ’homme armé (anonymous...

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Unformatted text preview: L ’homme armé (anonymous 15th-century French secular song, used as cantus firmus in more than forty masses) Claudio Monteverdi, cantus firmus from Ave maris ste!a from the Vespers of 1610 Westron Wynde (early 16th-century song used as cantus firmus) Aldwell/Schachter, 63 First rule: From one perfect consonance to another perfect consonance, one must proceed in contrary or oblique motion. (i.e. no parallel octaves or fifths) Second rule: From a perfect consonance to an imperfect consonance, one may proceed in any of the three motions. Third rule: From an imperfect consonance to a perfect consonance, one must proceed in contrary or oblique motion. Fourth rule: From one imperfect consonance to another imperfect consonance, one may proceed in any of the three motions. Fux, Gradus ad Parnassum, 22 Aldwell/Schachter, 65 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course MUSIC 2101 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Class 19 presentation 2011 - L ’homme armé (anonymous...

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