Class 20 presentation (Eric's lecture slides)

Class 20 presentation (Eric's lecture slides) -...

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October 17, 2011 Cantus Firmus and 1st Species Counterpoint Counterpoint
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Cantus Firmus Melodic line to which counterpoint is composed Should be fuid and easy to sing Typically Found in the tenor voice
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L ± homme Armé http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRsDgtqtx5Q
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Cantus Firmus
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Rules for Melodic Composition Permissible Melodic Intervals Major and minor 2nds Major and minor 3rds Perfect 4ths and 5ths Major and Minor 6ths (Fux recommends not using intervals larger than a 5th) Perfect octaves (largest possible leap) B) Impermissible Melodic Intervals 7ths Augmented or diminished intervals (e.g. A4 or D5)
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Rules for Melodic Composition Melodic Intervals: Correct Incorrect (7ths or tritones) m3 m2 m2 M2 M2 M3 m2 M2 m7 A4
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Rules for Melodic Composition Characteristics of Melodic Fluency Motion is mostly stepwise Leaps are used sparingly to achieve variety and to relieve stepwise motion (usually no more than 3 leaps in a CF - unless it is a long CF)
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Rules for Melodic Composition Characteristics of Melodic Fluency No immediately repeated tones are used - create static areas that throw the melodic line out of balance Incorrect
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Gradual rise to a high point (climax), followed by descending motion to the end of the line (cadence) The high point can occur shortly after the beginning or in the middle of the line
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course MUSIC 2101 at Cornell.

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Class 20 presentation (Eric's lecture slides) -...

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