Class 25 presentation 2011 - The M onte The Monte (see...

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Unformatted text preview: The M onte The Monte (see chap. 7) was the preferred schema for an ascending sequence. In the earlier eighteenth century, Montes of three or more sections could effect relatively distant modulations. In the later eighteenth century, Montes usually had only two sections that highlighted the subdominant and dominant keys, often in advance of an important cadence. W e ak yx 6 5 7 W e ak Strong yx w 5 3 1 One step higher 6 5 7 Strong w 5 3 1 Central Features • Two or more main sections, with each succeeding section one step higher. • In the melody, an overall rise, with local descents that complement the ascending leading tones in the bass. • In the bass, consecutive chromatic ascents from leading tones to local tonics. In the diatonic variant, the bass rises similarly but without the chromatic semitones. • A sequence of two or more pairs of sonorities where 6/5/3 precedes 5/3. The mode of the stable 5/3 sonority often cannot be predicted. Variants • Extensions of the rising IV-to-V sequence to VI or even to VII and I. • Diatonic types featuring the 6–5–6–5 . . . interval pattern. • A Principale type with all 5/3 sonorities and a bass that alternately leaps up a fourth, then down a third. • A Romanesca type with an up-a-fifth, down-a-fourth bass and characteristic 4–3 suspensions. Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style, 458 mon there as was the Fonte. For a model Monte, Riepel gave only a melody, following his custom:1 e x . 7.1 Riepel, a Monte melody (1757) 3E &4 bX X XX E X X #X X b 2w ?2 53 6 5 7 F major w 1 ¯ As mentioned in chapter 4, Riepel’s readers could have associated the melody with the t ypical complete context, mentally supplying an appropriate bass. In this C-major context the implied bass would normally include the leading tone and tonic first of F major andetx . 7.of G Zingarelli,ea Monte7bass nrom a partimento, Allegro, m. Z3 (ca. 1790s) hen 2 major. In xample .2, a f excerpt from a partimento by 5 ingarelli gives the important thoroughbass cue of “6/ 5” to begin the ascending chromatic line created by this rising sequence.2 G major 6 5 #w 7 w 1 89 Riepel, a Monte with both melody and bass (1752) F major y 3 X X bX &4 { { 3 E. ?4 { { 7 x w jE . X ¯ e x . 7.3 XX X 1 G major y XXX jE . X 7 1 #E . x w XX X e x . 7. 4 Clementi, Opus 4, no. 5, mvt. 2, Allegretto, m. 97 (London, 1780) subdominant (IV) bb 2 X . &4 97 y XX X X X J XX 2XX bb 4 ? X b nX X J J b & XX n) X X b( ?b 101 100 X b X X nX x. X w X J XX XX XXX bX 7 X bX X X 1 XX J y dominant (V) X J XX XX 7 XXX bX x E XXX X 1 wX . J X J 7 E 1 ¥ yx XXX XXX 7 1 #E ¥ w E ¯ XXX w ¯ 3 X X bX &4 3E ¥ ?4 yx A minor G major F major ¥ yx XXX XX 7 1 #E Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style, 92 ¥ w E e x . 7. 6 Clementi, Opus 4, no. 2, mvt. 2, Presto, m. 105 (London, 1780) bbb 2 { &4 bb 2 ?b 4 { 1. subdominant (IV) y X X nX X X X {J a D & XX Xa { b b b nX X X nX & D b b # X X nX # X b & bb b D & 113 13 y X XX 7 D X nX w X 1 D a aX J XXX X nX X v x X 3. submediant (VI) nX nX X a 7 X vx nX X X XX X 1 2. dominant (V) nX X X a y X X aX J w D 7 109 109 bbb & X X X bx X XX v w X a a XXX 1 e x . 7.7 Clementi, Opus 4, no. 2, mvt. 2, Presto, m. 24 (London, 1780) 1. to the dominant (V in B major) X. b b b 2 X nX X X X & 4J bb 2 X X X X X b4J ? X J X X v u {X X X X X X X nX X X X X X X nX X X XX X 5 4 2. to the submediant (VI in B major) b b b nX X X X & X nX X X b ?b b 29 b b b #X X X X & XXXX b ?b b 33 nX . X J X X wv XX nX X X X nX X X X 5 X. X J 3. to the . . . nX XX X XXXXX X X X XX u 6 clausula vera (on V) nX X X n{ X nX X XX 6 2 u X X a nX X 95 Chapter 7 t he monte 1 e x . 7. 8 ? A simplification of the accompaniment of ex. 7.7 E bbb E 5 E E E E EE EE E E E E E E E nE nE EEE E E 6 6 5 6 6 5 5 8 5 Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style, 94-95 6 As with the Fonte, the different sections of a Monte mediate local and global meanings that seem incompatible when expressed in any single system of symbols. One could 6 Durante, Studio no. 6, Adagio, m. 1 (Naples, 1747) e x . 7.15 do-re-mi u Romanesca v « y XX « y XX Xu b 4 XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX XXXXXX X X X X« X b4 & X XX X X XX X X X 4X X X X X X X X X X bb 4 ? 1 u 1 76 4 3 w z X XXXX X X X X XX XXXXX X X 5 X X X kX X X XX X X XX 1 XX XX XX 4 « w b XXXXXXXX XX XXXX XXXX XX nXXX j X X X X &b X X XXXX X XX X X X X X X nX XXX X X X XXX X XXX X XXX X XX b XX ?b prinner 3 y XX X X XXXXX 3 x 2 « X Xyx w bb ® X bX X X #X X &XX XXX X X X XXX X b X X X b ? v 5 5 7 1 5 1 5 mon t e v « X X X X X nXyx X X nX X # X wX X X X X ® nX XX X X X nX X X 7 1 XX XX X XXj XXX J e x . 7.1 4 C. P. E. Bach, Sonata in A Major (H. 186), mvt. 1, Allegro assai, mm. 13, 95 (ca. 1765–66) 5 71 Txw X J X X X X X #X X X K X X #X #X X X X #X X X a X a X a ¥ JJ X X X .. XX aJ ¯ 13 X X yT w # # # 4 X a X X a X a X Xx X ¥ X XJ J X X X J 4X & X X# X X X ### 4 X#XX X a X a X a ¥ JJ 4X ? kX y XX X 5 71 major T T ¯ XX z y x 95 X X . zj y x w x # 4 nX a X X a X a X X w X ## X J J X X #X X ¥ X a X X . X X X X X X X X XX X J aXX X X J aXX &4 X X XX X X a X X X 71 ### 4 #X X X X a X a X JJ 71 ? 4 #X X minor 7 7 monte principale 4w &4 E E E 5 E5 4 3 E3 ?4 E w #E EE E EE 5 4 #w E EE E EE wE # E EE E E 6 102 w w w w m usic in the galant style The result is a diatonic Monte in which all chords are in 5/3 position. Or put another way, the G-major diatonic Monte heard in the upper three voices is accompanied by its chordal e x . 7.1 6 Durante, Studio no. 2, Allegro, m. 6 (Naples, 1747) roots in the bass, in what the Neapolitans called movimento principale (“root-position motion”)—hence my term “Monte Principale.” Fenaroli describes another pattern as having a bass that “rises a fifth and falls a fourth,” Monte principale and he again presents a series of chords in root position. Here is his realization in melodic ## 4 4 XookX3, nXo. 12, m.X1 (ca. 1770s)# X X XX Fenaroli, & Partimenti, b aXaXaXa ## 4 X J J J J monte 4 omanesca ?R 6 “second position” (the chordal third begins the melody): e x . 7.1 2 w E 4E &4 E 4E ?4 5 3 1 4E E #E v E {12345E 7 E #5 E uvwxyz E E E E E 6 E E E E 5 3 E sixth and final divertimento: E E X X X X X X #X X XaXaXaXa JJJJ E w w w k X X 6 w Finally, the Monte Romanesca provides a scaffolding for the playful triads in Durante’s ex 2. 7.17 3 Durante, Divertimento no. 6, Allegro, m. 1 (Naples, 1747) Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style, 98 monte romanesca E 4w E &4 E 4E ?4 5 3 1 e x . 7.18 E ## E E v E E E uvwxyz{12345E 7 E E E E E 6 E E E w w w monte Romanesca E 5 3 E E E E 3 Chapter 7 t he2 monte w 103 Quantz, Essay on the Art of Playing the Flute, his Fig. 4, Table 21 (1752) descending hexachord fonte Uw b E XX X &E X u ?b E 5 E 5 xw monte romanesca z XXXX X XE E 2 xw cadenza doppia w «v XE X #X X X X XXE XXE ww 3 w w y x 71 71 « E uvwxyz{X 234567 1X E 6 5 u 1 Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style, 98, 103 The Monte Romanesca was an important part of the “strict” or sacred style t aught in many partimenti. As in Quantz’s example, there was often a series of 4–3 suspensions, a u ?b E E E 5 5 E E 2 71 71 « XX 3 6 w w 5 1 The Monte Romanesca was an important part of the “strict” or sacred style t aught in many partimenti. As in Quantz’s example, there was often a series of 4–3 suspensions, a trait made explicit in a partimento given by Mozart to his student Thomas Attwood (the bass and figures are Mozart’s, the realization is mine): e x . 7.19 Mozart, Attwood Studies (1785–86) Monte Romanesca Monte Romanesca C l . V. C l . V. 4 X X X X X EX X X X # E E & 2 w E E XXX E E XXE XX E E XE 1 4E E w ?2 w 5 1 64 3 {u { u #E E nE &EE E E 6 2 fonte 5 w E 4 3 4 3 X X X X X #E E XXE EE EEw 5 =2 #6 1 EE E E ? w 6 4 w 5 u #E w EE 5 5 2 2 3 2 3 uvwxyz{1234567 n #6 6 n6 b 4 3 = 2 1=2 6 6 #6 4 cadenza doppia Monte Romanesca X b X X X X EX X E E XX X E EEw # 6 4 X nX # X X X E E # 5 6 4 { X X #X E w 5 # u # 1 # n 5 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course MUSIC 2101 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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