18 hist 103 nov. 9

18 hist 103 nov. 9 - History 103 Slavery in the Old South,...

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Slavery in the Old South , 1790-1850 Nov. 9, 2011 History 103 Web
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Reminders: class etiquette
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News of note Instructions for paper due November 30 are now posted in the Assignments section of the main course BB site. Next week: no additional readings for recitation. Instead of the reading review questions, there is a paper worksheet for you to fill in. We will be going over the paper instructions and giving you tips on how to write it. A review sheet for the final exam will be provided after the Thanksgiving holidays.
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The Cotton Kingdom By 1815, Cotton Belt expanded into uplands of Georgia and South Carolina Native peoples driven out Jeffersonian republicans ended Indian resistance and secured access to international markets for cotton planters What Jefferson had envisioned as “empire of liberty” became in Southwest stronghold of slavery….
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The interstate slave trade Way in advance of 1808 end of international slave trade, domestic slave trade began to expand By 1820s, interstate slave trade was flourishing Well traveled routes from Norfolk, Virgina, to New Orleans, including slave pens and safe houses “being sold down the river”: a reality for many slaves Horrors similar to the infamous “middle passage”
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A “modern” business Application of new business practices to slave trade: use of sophisticated financing, new transportation forms Next to plantation, “the domestic slave trade was the biggest and most modern business in the South.” p. 349 “While northerners exchanged wheat, furniture, books, and shoes with each other, Southerners exchanged slaves.” (349)
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Plantation and Southern Economic Growth Plantation system was immensely profitable In 1860, slaves alone were worth $3 billion dollars Land and slaves provided esteem in the South But market revolution developed differently in South than in North Southerners purchased fewer manufactured goods than in North Southern farmers did not take advantage of new technologies; used slaves instead
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This note was uploaded on 01/02/2012 for the course HIS 103 taught by Professor Nedlandsman during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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18 hist 103 nov. 9 - History 103 Slavery in the Old South,...

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