chapt09_lec

chapt09_lec - 9-1Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Chapter 9Models of...

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Unformatted text preview: 9-1Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Chapter 9Models of Chemical Bonding9-2Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Models of Chemical Bonding9.1 Atomic Properties and Chemical Bonds9.2The Ionic Bonding Model9.3 The Covalent Bonding Model9.4Between the Extremes: Electronegativity and Bond Polarity9.5An Introduction to Metallic Bonding9-3Dr. Wolfs CHM 101A general comparison of metals and nonmetals9-4Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Types of Chemical Bonding1. Metal with nonmetal:electron transfer and ionic bonding2. Nonmetal with nonmetal:electron sharing and covalent bonding3. Metal with metal:electron pooling and metallic bonding9-5Dr. Wolfs CHM 101The three models of chemical bonding9-6Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Lewis Electron-Dot SymbolsFor main group elements -Example:Nitrogen, N, is in Group 5A and therefore has 5 valence electrons.N:...The A group number gives the number of valence electrons.Place one dot per valence electron on each of the four sides of the element symbol.Pair the dots (electrons) until all of the valence electrons are used.9-7Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Lewis electron-dot symbols for elements in Periods 2 and 39-8Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Ionic BondingIonic bonding results when there is a transfer of electrons between two atoms. Each atom achieves a full outer level of electrons. For many atoms in the 2nd and 3rd period, this would be 8 electrons, known as the octet rule.9-9Dr. Wolfs CHM 101SAMPLE PROBLEM 9.1Depicting Ion FormationPLAN:SOLUTION:PROBLEM:Use partial orbital diagrams and Lewis symbols to depict the formation of Na+and O2-ions from the atoms, and determine the formula of the compound....
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chapt09_lec - 9-1Dr. Wolfs CHM 101Chapter 9Models of...

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