Week 9 A Chapter 40 Radiation Protection, Chapter 31 QC

Week 9 A Chapter 40 Radiation Protection, Chapter 31 QC -...

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Chapter 40 Radiation Protection Procedures ALARA and Occupational Exposure
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ALARA ALARA stands for As Low As Reasonably Achievable. It is the basic principle of radiation protection procedures. There is much that we can do to keep exposure to the patient and the operator as low as possible. The chiropractor is unique in the fact that you can perform radiography and refer your patients for other types of examinations.
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Occupational Exposures In radiologic technology, 95% of the occupational exposure comes from fluoroscopy and mobile radiography. Neither would be used in your office so the worst case scenario is that you would receive 5% of the exposure that a technologist would receive.
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Occupational Exposures During radiography, the operator should be behind a protective barrier. These barriers are usually considered as secondary barriers so protection would be from tube leakage and scatter from the patient. The tube should never be pointed toward this type barrier. If the barrier can have the tube angled toward the barrier. It must be a primary barrier. Staying behind the barrier effectively eliminates the source of occupational exposure if the shielding is adequate.
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Occupational Exposures Medical Imaging Exposures Fluoroscopy: All personnel will wear protective apron. If extremities get into the beam lead gloves can be worn. The radiologist will usually be close to the machine during fluoroscopy so their exposure will be higher than that the technologist. Aprons between the Image intensifier and Bucky Slot covers reduce radiologist exposure. The technologist should stand as far away from the table as possible during the exam and move closed only when necessary. The radiologist will use short burst of exposure and keep the exposure time as short as possible. The 5 minute clock timer will alarm when 5 minutes of fluoroscopy has been used.
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Occupational Exposures Medical Imaging Exposures Mobile radiography: The technologist must wear a lead apron during mobile plain film or fluoroscopy examinations. An apron must be assigned to each portable machine. The exposure cord for portable radiographic machines must be 2 meters long to maximize distance from the tube during exposures.
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Occupational Exposures Radiology Ancillary Staff Assuming the rooms are adequately shielded, the receptionist, file room and darkroom staff should not receive any occupational exposure. Radiology ancillary staff should not be used to hold patients during radiography.
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Occupational Radiation Monitoring Occupational Radiation Monitoring is required if there is any likelihood that an individual will receive more than 1/10 of the recommended dose.
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This note was uploaded on 01/03/2012 for the course LC 232 taught by Professor Wilson during the Fall '08 term at Palmer Chiropractic.

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Week 9 A Chapter 40 Radiation Protection, Chapter 31 QC -...

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