lec23_19nov2010

lec23_19nov2010 - What can the asteroid belt tell us about...

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Ge/Ay133 What can the asteroid belt tell us about the early S.S.? ? 433 Eros Phobos
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These types are not strongly separated, radially.
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See also http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/~hsieh/mbcs.html Comets are icy bodies that sublimate and become active when close to the Sun. They are believed to originate in two cold reservoirs beyond the orbit of Neptune: the Kuiper Belt (equilibrium temperatures of ~40 kelvin) and the Oort Cloud (~ 10 kelvin). We present optical data showing the existence of a population of comets originating in a third reservoir: the main asteroid belt. The main-belt comets are unlike the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud comets in that they likely formed where they currently reside and may be collisionally activated. The existence of the main-belt comets lends new support to the idea that main-belt objects could be a major source of terrestrial water.
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Asteroid Itokawa as imaged by the Hayabusa probe. http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/snews/2005/1102.shtml
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Collisions II
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How do we measure rotation states?
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