Jamestown - Jamestown In A Nutshell In 1607, England...

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Jamestown In A Nutshell In 1607, England planted 105 colonists on the coast of Virginia in a new settlement named Jamestown. Over the first decade of its existence, the colony struggled simply to survive. Despite the delivery of roughly 6000 settlers over Jamestown's first 15 years, the town counted only 1200 living residents as late as 1625. But the discovery that tobacco could be successfully grown at Jamestown and sold abroad for great profits triggered a gold rush -like boom that lasted through the 1620s. By 1630, tobacco prices had fallen, ending the smoky bonanza of the previous decade. But even if the gold rush in tobacco was over, the crop still provided real opportunities for Jamestown's settlers, most of them indentured servants, to attain success. By the end of the seventeenth century, Virginia was England's most valuable overseas colony. It generated a small fortune in import tax revenue and provided English tobacco merchants with a valuable product for re- export throughout Europe. But Virginia achieved its economic success only by introducing slavery to England's North American colonies; by the end of the century, the slave ships docked alongside the tobacco fleet in the Chesapeake provided a stark reminder of the horrific cost of
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Jamestown - Jamestown In A Nutshell In 1607, England...

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