Colonial Virginia Summary

Colonial Virginia Summary - Colonial Virginia Summary &...

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A Colony of Contradictions Eighteenth-century Virginia was a colony filled with contradictions. In many ways it was the most philosophically progressive of Britain's North American possessions; in other ways it was the most backward and dishonest. Wealthy Virginians viewed themselves as refined and their lifestyles as genteel but their entire society was filled with—if not indeed built upon—violence. The colony recognized the Anglican Church as its established religion, but its influence was uneven at best, and religious reform, when it came, came from outside the colony. Politically, Virginia boasted the oldest popularly elected legislature on the continent. Its House of Burgesses was founded in 1619. But it was more than just the first representative governmental body in America. By the eighteenth century its members had crafted a uniquely well developed institutional identity—Burgesses viewed themselves as bulwarks against executive power, the last line of defense against overreaching kings and governors. The Burgesses' authority, moreover, was drawn from the people—a large majority of Virginia's adult white men were eligible to vote and did so. But while Virginia's political philosophy was enlightened, its racial views were not. Virginians'
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Colonial Virginia Summary - Colonial Virginia Summary &...

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