Patterns of Continuity

Patterns of Continuity - Patterns of Continuity In the twin...

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Patterns of Continuity In the twin histories of immigration and nativism in America we find a remarkable degree of continuity across four centuries. The economic forces that drove immigrants from Ireland to the United States in the 1840s aren't much different from those driving immigrants from Mexico to the United States today. Benjamin Franklin's objections to heavy German immigration into Pennsylvania in the 1750s aren't much different from Lou Dobbs 's objections to heavy Mexican immigration into America today. The descendents of English immigrants fought Irish immigration in the 1840s on much the same grounds as the descendents of Irish immigrants fought Eastern European immigration in the 1920s, and as descendents of Eastern European immigrants fight Mexican immigration today. Still, the high degree in continuity in the past patterns of American immigration and acculturation shouldn't necessarily be read as proof that the same patterns will continue into the future. History is not a normative science; there is no guarantee that the current wave of
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Patterns of Continuity - Patterns of Continuity In the twin...

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