Battling the Tyrant George

Battling the Tyrant - Battling the Tyrant George Jefferson's credentials as a politician thus left much to be desired but by 1796 he had emerged as

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Battling the Tyrant George Jefferson's credentials as a politician thus left much to be desired, but by 1796 he had emerged as the leader of the opposition. At that point he was known, somewhat ironically, as much for his opposition to the government of George Washington as he was for his earlier eloquent denunciation of British tyranny. But in Jefferson's own mind, and in the minds of his supporters , the opposition movements of 1796 and 1776 were much the same. Less than a decade after the ratification of the Constitution, Jefferson had become convinced that the government created by the American Revolution had steered badly off course. Alexander Hamilton, the influential (and, in Jefferson's judgment, antidemocratic) Secretary of the Treasury, had corrupted the administration of George Washington, putting the ideals secured in America's war for independence in serious jeopardy. In retrospect, the political worldview expressed in Jefferson's correspondence from this period seems embarrassingly apocalyptic. His condemnation of Hamilton
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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