An Unpopular Victor

An Unpopular Victor - An Unpopular Victor? The secession...

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An Unpopular Victor? The secession crisis may help explain why Confederate leadership chose to use force to protest the presence of a Union fort in South Carolina, but the predicament itself does not answer the question of the war's causation. Why, exactly, did South Carolina—and ultimately eleven southern states—withdraw from the Union, and why did it do so in December 1860, rather than at some other time? The action was—in large part—a response to the election of Lincoln as president in 1860, a man who seemed to pose a significant threat to the economic and political interests of the slaveholding South. (The Republican candidate received not a single vote in ten southern states.) But Abraham Lincoln never vowed to abolish slavery, which was so vital to the South's agricultural economy and the basis for its political power. In fact, Lincoln stated in his inaugural address —one month before the battle at Fort Sumter—that he would not use his executive power to interfere with the institution in any state where it existed. The president was willing to
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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An Unpopular Victor - An Unpopular Victor? The secession...

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