From the Grimkés to Elizabeth Cady Stanton

From the Grimkés to Elizabeth Cady...

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From the Grimkés to Elizabeth Cady Stanton Stanton was the pivotal figure in the women's movement for the remainder of the nineteenth century. She was among the planners of the first women's rights convention in Seneca Falls in 1848, and she drafted the Declaration of Sentiments asserting the "self-evident" truth that "all men and women were created equal." She also defined an ambitious agenda for the movement that included reform to marriage and divorce, expanded property rights for women, and even dress reform. But most importantly, she was among the first women's activists to recognize that securing the right to vote was essential to advancing and preserving other rights. In opposition to her mentor Lucretia Mott, she included in her draft of the Seneca Falls resolutions one declaring it "the duty of women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise." This resolution barely passed in 1848, and for the next 50 years Stanton fought to make suffrage the central plank of the women's rights platform. (You can read more about her work and achievements here .) By the early twentieth century, Stanton's emphasis on the vote had been embraced by the women's movement, and she and her closest ally in the cause, Susan B. Anthony, had turned over
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From the Grimkés to Elizabeth Cady...

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