Whig party - executive was to serve as the enforcing agent...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Whig party Party Successes The two great leaders of the party were Clay and Webster, but neither was ever to head a victorious national ticket. This failure was partly a result of the sectional variations in the party, which had only one common aim, opposition to the Democrats, and partly a result of the power held by intraparty forces opposed to them, including the political bosses of New York, Thurlow Weed and William Seward . The party went on to victory in 1840 with the rousing “Log Cabin and Hard Cider” campaign, which put William H. Harrison in the White House. Harrison died after only one month in office and was succeeded by his Vice President, John Tyler of Virginia. A definite break now ensued between Tyler and the Whig leaders in Congress—a break that illustrated the Whig philosophy of government. The Whigs had originated in objection to what they considered the excessive power of the executive branch under Andrew Jackson. To them the legislative branch of the government represented the wishes of the people, and the task of the
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: executive was to serve as the enforcing agent of the legislative branch. When Tyler ignored the counsel of his cabinet and vetoed bills that sought to reestablish the Bank of the United States, about 50 Whig members of Congress met in caucus and read Tyler out of the party. At the behest of Clay the entire cabinet resigned; even Webster retired after completing the Webster-Ashburton Treaty (1843). Clay became the standard-bearer in 1844 but was defeated by James K. Polk . In 1848, Weed and his associates swung the nomination from Webster and Clay to Zachary Taylor , who had gained wide popularity as a commander in the Mexican War. This move temporarily prevented a division of the party, and although Taylor died while Clay was formulating the Compromise of 1850 in Congress, Millard Fillmore , his Vice President and presidential successor, kept the faith of the Whig party....
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online