Brown v - Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kans....

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Unformatted text preview: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kans. Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kans., case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1954. Linda Brown was denied admission to her local elementary school in Topeka because she was black. When, combined with several other cases, her suit reached the Supreme Court, that body, in an opinion by recently appointed Chief Justice Earl Warren , broke with long tradition and unanimously overruled the separate but equal doctrine of Plessy v. Ferguson , holding for the first time that de jure segregation in the public schools violated the principle of equal protection under the law guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Responding to legal and sociological arguments presented by NAACP lawyers led by Thurgood Marshall , the court stressed that the badge of inferiority stamped on minority children by segregation hindered their full development no matter how equal physical facilities might be. After hearing hindered their full development no matter how equal physical facilities might be....
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