Spontaneous Abortion

Spontaneous Abortion - Abortion can be induced for medical...

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Spontaneous Abortion (Mi scarriage) Early spontaneous abortion (the most prevalent) is usually due to fetal malformations or chromosomal abnormalities. Spontaneous abortion during the last two thirds of pregnancy is more likely to be due to maternal factors, for example abnormalities of the cervix or uterus, insufficient progesterone , sexually transmitted diseases that affect the genital tract, endocrine dysfunction (as in hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus), or severe emotional trauma. Immunological reactions, in which maternal antibodies mistake the fetus for foreign tissue, have been implicated in recurrent, or habitual spontaneous abortions. It is estimated that at least 20% of all pregnancies end in miscarriage (estimates range from 15% to 75%). Most occur in the first two weeks after conception, and in many cases the mother is not aware of the pregnancy. Induced Abortion
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Unformatted text preview: Abortion can be induced for medical reasons or because of an elective decision to end the pregnancy. Procedures for inducing abortion include vacuum suction (the most common, used in the early stages of pregnancy), dilatation and evacuation (D and E), induction (injection of abortifacients such as prostaglandins into the uterus), and hysterotomy (a surgical procedure similar to a cesarean section , used later in pregnancy, especially when the woman's life is in danger). The abortion pill, the drug RU-486 (mifepristone), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States in 2000. It is used within the first seven weeks of pregnancy. A second drug is taken two days later to start uterine contractions and complete the abortion. The drugs methotrexate and misoprostol have also been used experimentally to end early pregnancies....
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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