Franklin Delano Roosevel1

Franklin Delano Roosevel1 - Germans, aid to Britain...

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt The War Years Apart from extending diplomatic recognition to the USSR (1933), the main focus of Roosevelt's foreign policy in the early years was the cultivation of “hemisphere solidarity.” His “good neighbor” policy toward Latin America, which included the signing of reciprocal trade agreements with many countries, greatly improved relations with the neighboring republics to the south. By 1938, however, the international skies were black, and as the power of the Axis nations grew, Roosevelt spoke out against aggression and international greed. Although the United States refused to recognize Japan's conquest of Manchuria and decried Japanese aggression against China, negotiations with Japan went on even after World War II had broken out in Europe. After the fighting started, the program that Roosevelt had already begun— to build U.S. strength and make the country an “arsenal of democracy”—was speeded up. In the summer of 1940, after the fall of France and while Great Britain was being blitz-bombed by the
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Unformatted text preview: Germans, aid to Britain (permitted since relaxation of the Neutrality Act ) was greatly increased, and in 1941 lend-lease to the Allies was begun. In the presidential election of 1940 both of the major parties supported the national defense program and aid to Britain but opposed the entry of the United States into the war. In accepting the nomination for that year Roosevelt broke with tradition; never before had a President run for a third term. Some of his former associates were vocal in criticism. John N. Garner , who had been Vice President, was alienated, and the new vice presidential candidate was Henry A. Wallace. James A. Farley, who had been prominent in managing the earlier campaigns, fell away. John L. Lewis , with his large labor following, bitterly denounced Roosevelt. The Republican candidate, Wendell Willkie , had much more support than Roosevelt's earlier opponents, but again the President won, if by a closer margin....
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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