{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lecture-2 - Light for feedback CLICKERS Menu Enter buttons...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CLICKERS! LCD screen for feedback Numbered/lettered buttons for answering questions Menu & Enter buttons for adjusting clicker settings [ - Press MENU twice to put clicker in Presentation Mode (if not already). YES & NO (Down & Up) ] Light for feedback Channel 60 - To answer, press letter/number.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Channel 60 Press and release GO / Ch button. While light flashing red/green, enter channel (60). Press GO / Ch . Press/release one of the numeric buttons light should flash yellow. Press the MENU button until you see the main screen. Use the down arrow key (Yes) to select the Change Channel Menu item. Press the Enter key to change the channel. You will momentarily see the change channel screen. If the current channel is correct, then press the Enter button, otherwise use keypad to enter 60. Press Enter to change to the new channel. If the channel is correct, the ResponseCard will report that the channel has been changed and the receiver was found. After the ResponseCard has successfully found a receiver, it will enter into Presentation Mode and you can begin entering answers when polling is open.
Image of page 2
What good is ‘half’ an eye? Better than no eye at all! Evolution of the camera eye
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Simple Complex Eyes Eye spot e.g., Euglena Eye cup e.g., Dugesia Pinhole eye e.g., Nautilus Primitive lens e.g., Box jellyfish
Image of page 4
Evolution of Eyes Modern-day closely-related spp. show gradient from simple to complex eyes (e.g. Mollusca)
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Limpet simple layer of photosensitive cells Slit-shell snail simple layer of photosensitive cells curved in eyecup Nautilus pinhole-camera eye Squid advanced camera eye
Image of page 6
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Organisms Making Their Own Light: Bioluminescence Range of organisms can use chemical energy to make light referred to as bioluminescence Bio = living Lumen = Light Bioluminescent organisms use light to: Attract a mate Camouflage Attract prey Communicate
Image of page 8