chapter10a Sensory Physiology 1

chapter10a Sensory Physiology 1 - Chapter 10a Sensory...

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Chapter 10a Sensory Physiology
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About this Chapter General properties of sensory systems Somatic senses Chemoreception: smell and taste The ear: hearing The ear: equilibrium The eye and vision
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Table 10-1 (1 of 2) General Properties: Sensory Division
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Table 10-1 (2 of 2) General Properties: Sensory Division
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Sensory Pathways Stimulus as physical energy  sensory receptor Receptor acts as a transducer Intracellular signal  usually change in membrane potential Stimulus  threshold  action potential to CNS Integration in CNS  cerebral cortex or acted on subconsciously
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Figure 10-1a Stimulus Cell body Unmyelinated axon Free nerve endings (a) Somatosensory Receptors
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Figure 10-1b Stimulus Enclosed nerve ending Layers of connective tissue Myelinated axon Cell body (b) Somatosensory Receptors
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Figure 10-1c Stimulus Myelinated axon Cell body of sensory neuron Synaptic vesicles Specialized receptor cell (hair cell) Synapse (c) Somatosensory Receptors
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Table 10-2 Sensory Receptors
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Sensory Transduction Stimulus energy converted into information processed by CNS Ion channels or second messengers initiate membrane potential change Adequate stimulus : Preferred form of stimulus Threshold : Minimum stimulus Receptor potential : Change in sensory receptor membrane potential
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Figure 10-2 The receptive fields of three primary sensory neurons overlap to form one large secondary receptive field. Primary sensory neurons Secondary sensory neuron SECTION THROUGH SPINAL CORD Information from the secondary receptive field goes to the brain. The primary sensory neurons converge on one secondary sensory neuron. Receptive Fields of Sensory Neurons
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Figure 10-3a One signal goes to the brain. Compass with points separated by 20 mm Primary sensory neurons Skin surface Secondary sensory neurons (a) Sensory Neurons: Two-Point Discrimination Two-point discrimination varies with the size of the secondary receptive field
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chapter10a Sensory Physiology 1 - Chapter 10a Sensory...

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