chapter10b Sensory Physiology 2

chapter10b Sensory Physiology 2 - Chapter 10b Sensory...

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Chapter 10b Sensory Physiology
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Chemoreception: Smell and Taste Olfaction is one of the oldest senses Taste is a combination of five basic sensations Taste transduction
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Olfaction Link between smell, memory, and emotion Vomeronasal organ (VNO) in rodents Response to sex pheromones Olfactory cells Olfactory epithelium in nasal cavity Odorants bind to odorant receptors, G- protein-cAMP-linked membrane receptors
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Anatomy Summary: The Olfactory System Figure 10-14a (a) The olfactory epithelium lies high within the nasal cavity, and its olfactory cells project to the olfactory bulb. Olfactory bulb Olfactory tract Olfactory epithelium
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Anatomy Summary: The Olfactory System Figure 10-14b (b) The olfactory cells synapse with secondary sensory neurons in the olfactory bulb. Olfactory bulb Olfactory epithelium Secondary sensory neurons Primary sensory neurons (olfactory cells) Bone
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Anatomy Summary: The Olfactory System Figure 10-14c (c) Olfactory cells in the olfactory epithelium live only about two months. They are replaced by new cells whose axons must find their way to the olfactory bulb. Olfactory receptor cell axons (cranial nerve I) carry information to olfactory bulb. Lamina propria Developing olfactory cell Olfactory cell (sensory neuron) Supporting cell Olfactory cilia (dendrites) contain odorant receptors. Mucus layer: Odorant molecules must dissolve in this layer. Basal cell layer includes stem cells that replace olfactory receptor cells.
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Olfactory Pathways Figure 10-15
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Taste Buds Figure 10-16a–b
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Taste Buds Figure 10-16c (c) Taste ligands create Ca2+ signals that release serotonin or ATP. Sweet Umami Bitter Salty or sour Tight junction Support cell Receptor cells Primary gustatory neurons Serotonin Presynaptic cell ATP
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Summary of Taste Transduction Figure 10-17 5 4 3 2 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 1 2 3 4 5 Sweet, umami, or bitter ligand
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chapter10b Sensory Physiology 2 - Chapter 10b Sensory...

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