chapter26a Reproduction and Development 1

chapter26a Reproduction and Development 1 - Chapter 26a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 26a Reproduction and Development
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
About this Chapter Sex determination and differentiation Gametogenesis and patterns of reproduction Male reproductive development and physiology Female reproductive development and physiology Pregnancy and the birth process The reproductive system during growth and aging
Background image of page 2
Sex Determination Sexual dimorphism Females and males are physically distinct Gonads produce gametes and sex hormones Male gonads = testes  sperm Female gonads = ovaries  eggs Sex hormones direct development of genitalia Internal genitalia External genitalia
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 26-1 Sex Determination Is Directed By Our Genome Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes 22 pairs of autosomes X and Y = 1 pair of sex chromosomes Nondisjunction XXX superfemale XXY Klinefelters X0 Turners XYY supermale
Background image of page 4
Figure 26-2 X and Y Chromosomes Determine Sex
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sexual Differentiation Bipotential tissues have not yet differentiated SRY protein directs development as a male Gonadal medulla develops into testis Testicular hormones direct further development Absence of SRY protein leads to female development Gonadal cortex develops into ovarian tissue Mullerian ducts develop into female organs Wolffian ducts degenerate
Background image of page 6
Table 26-1 Sexual Differentiation
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 26-3a Development of Internal Reproductive Organs FEMALE MALE Bipotential gonad Müllerian duct Müllerian duct Uterus Uterus (a) DEVELOPMENT OF INTERNAL ORGANS Ovary Vagina Fallopian tube (from Müllerian duct) Testis Testis Prostate Seminal vesicle Vas deferens Wolffian duct Epididymis Wolffian duct Cloacal opening Kidney Anti-Müllerian hormone from testis causes the Müllerian ducts to disappear. Absence of anti- Müllerian hormone allows the Müllerian duct to become the fallopian tube, uterus, and upper part of the vagina. Bipotential stage: 6 week fetus The internal reproductive organs have the potential to develop into male or female structures Testosterone from testis converts Wolffian duct into seminal vesicle, vas deferens, and epididymis. DHT controls prostate development.
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/03/2012 for the course BIO 308 taught by Professor Acbrown during the Spring '10 term at Portland.

Page1 / 23

chapter26a Reproduction and Development 1 - Chapter 26a...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online