Lecture 20 - Lymphatics & Immune System

Lecture 20 - Lymphatics & Immune System -...

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Lymphatics and the Immune System
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2 Lymphatic System One way system: to the heart Return of collected excess tissue fluid Return of leaked protein “Lymph” is this fluid Edema results if system blocked or surgically removed
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3 Lymph capillaries Have one way minivalves allowing excess fluid to enter but not leave Picks up bacteria and viruses as well as proteins, electrolytes and fluid (lymph nodes destroy most pathogens)
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5 Lymph capillaries Absent from bone, bone marrow, teeth, CNS Enter lymphatic collecting vessels Lymphatic collecting vessels Superficial ones in skin travel with superficial veins Deep ones of trunk and digestive viscera travel with deep arteries Very low pressure Distinctive appearance on lymphangiography Drain into lymph nodes
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6 Lymph nodes: bean shaped organs along lymphatic collecting vessels Up to 1 inch in size Clusters of both deep and superficial LNs
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7 Superficial groups -Cervical -Axillary -Inguinal Deep groups -Tracheobronchial -Aortic -Iliac Drainage -Superior R 1/4 of body: R lymphatic duct (green) * -The rest: thoracic duct * Lymph Nodes * *
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8 Fibrous capsule sends in dividing trabeculae Lymph percolates through lymph sinuses Follicles: masses of lymphoid tissue divided into outer cortex & inner medulla (details in later slides)
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9 Macrophages on reticular fibers consume pathogens and foreign particles Usually pathogen free lymph enters lymph trunks
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10 Lymphatic Trunks (all are paired except the intestinal trunk) Lumbar Intestinal Receives fatty lymph (chyle) absorbed through lacteals in fingerlike villi of intestines Broncho- mediastinal Subclavian Jugular
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11 Lymph ducts (variable) Thoracic duct: everyone has 20% also have a right lymphatic duct * 20%
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13 The Immune System Recognizes specific foreign molecules Each exposure (to the same pathogen) increases the effectivity of the response Lymphoid organs Lymph nodes Spleen Thymus Tonsils Small intestine & appendix aggregated lymphoid nodules
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14 Basic Immunology Depends on the ability of the immune system to distinguish between self and non-self molecules Self molecules are those components of an organism's body that can be distinguished from foreign substances by the immune system Autoimmunity is an immune reaction against self molecules (causes various diseases) Non-self molecules are those recognized as foreign molecules One class of non-self molecules are called antigens (short for anti body gen erators) and are defined as substances that bind to specific immune receptors and elicit an immune response
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15 Lymphocytes the primary cells of the lymphoid system Respond to: Invading organisms Abnormal body cells, such as virus-infected cells or cancer cells Foreign proteins such as the toxins released
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BIO 324 taught by Professor Crawford during the Spring '09 term at Western Kentucky University.

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Lecture 20 - Lymphatics & Immune System -...

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