DOC-20190228-WA0000.docx - Week 6 Avoiding Misplaced and...

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Week 6 Avoiding Misplaced and Dangling Modifiers Misplaced Modifiers A misplaced modifier is a word, phrase, or clause that is improperly separated from the word it modifies / describes. Because of the separation, sentences with this error often sound awkward, ridiculous, or confusing. Furthermore, they can be downright illogical. Example The example above suggests that a gold man owns a watch. Misplaced modifiers can usually be corrected by moving the modifier to a more sensible place in the sentence, generally next to the word it modifies. Example Now it is the watch that is gold. There are several kinds of misplaced modifiers: 1. Misplaced adjectives are incorrectly separated from the nouns they modify and almost always distort the intended meaning. Example 1 Correct the error by placing the adjective next to the noun it modifies . Corrected
Example 2 Corrected Sentences like these are common in everyday speech and ordinarily cause their listeners no trouble. However, they are quite imprecise and, therefore, should have NO place in your writing. 2. Placement of adverbs can also change meaning in sentences.For example, the sentences below illustrate how the placement of just can change the sentence's meaning. : :
Each of these sentences says something logical but quite different , and its correctness depends upon what the writer has in mind. Often, misplacing an adverb not only alters the intended meaning, but also creates a sentence whose meaning is highly unlikely or completely ridiculous. This sentence, for example, suggests that we brought a lunch slowly: To repair the meaning, move the adverb slowly so that it is near ate. Watch out for adverbs such as only, just, nearly, merely , and almost . They are often misplaced and cause an unintended meaning. This sentence, for example, means that I only contributed the money: Repaired, however, the sentence means that I contributed only $10.00. Like adjectives, adverbs are commonly misplaced in everyday speech, and may not cause listeners difficulty. However, such sentences are quite imprecise and, therefore, should have NO place in your writing. 3. Misplaced phrases may cause a sentence to sound awkward and may create a meaning that does not make sense. The problem sentences below contain misplaced phrases that modify the wrong nouns. To fix the errors and clarify the meaning, put the phrases next to the noun they are supposed to modify.
Example 1 (a buyer with leather seats?) Corrected Example 2 (a corner smoking pipes?) Corrected Example 3 (a house made of barbed wire?) Corrected
4. Misplaced clauses may cause a sentence to sound awkward and may create a meaning that does not make sense.

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