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probs in park! - Problem in the Parks National parks are...

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Problem in the Parks National parks are beautiful reserved regions on the earth that are filled with incredible natural resources that encompass beautiful scenery. They are owned by the government, but provide enjoyment for everyone. The sights are breathtaking, and the territory is phenomenal. Air pollution is the presence of unwanted substances in the air. There are different types of air pollution, and they come from different sources. First, mobile sources of air pollution come from things that move, such as cars, airplanes, busses, boats, trains, and even lawnmowers. Components of agriculture and nature, such as manure and fertilization, volcanoes and forest fires, also create air pollution. (“Air Pollution”). Air pollution undergoes processes such as emission, exhange, immission, and depostion, are able to be transported and distributed. (FAQ Air Pollution). The compounds and contaminants react with one another in the atmoshere. Effects of air pollution on human health includes coughing, burning eyes and respiratory problems. (Eastbum). Natural resources, animals and people can be harmed by air pollution. For example, at Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, air pollution has decreased the growth plants such as of tulip poplar, green ash, sweet gum, black locust, eastern hemlock, and pitch pine. ( "Air Pollution Jeopardizes National Parks”). Pollutants move with the wind and can come from these sources either close or from hundreds of miles away. This air pollution can cause health damage to visitors and workers at the park. In addition, it causes poor visibility, thus ruining the scenic value of the parks.
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