27 - this contributes to the mixed motives if you know...

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4/27 Judge a culture based on the language used Being handicapped/disabled Judged as less than equal; heirarchy Not able to do something – focus on what they can’t do Ablism – what people can do Kleck – to get away from negative language, better to say physically different Missing 1+ limb, wheel chair, war veteran, cancer patient Facial scarring Culture of beauty; burn victim Adults are more avoidant Kleck – research is different than real life bec we usually ignore the disabled In our society, to be physically different is to be stigmatized People are conflicted discrepency between self-report and actual behavior the “normal” person will be anxious (body shifts), exit quicker, mixed motives – taught to treat others nicely (smile, hold door) vs. negative motives (anxiety, uncertainty) greater threat: missing limb, obesity not contagious feel threatened with tourettes, aspergers (not sure how they will act/react to us) think about how it could affect you; it could happen to me
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Unformatted text preview: this contributes to the mixed motives if you know someone who is different, less likely to act different to them hastorf – observed a person performing a task. ½ physically different ½ normal assessment of the performance of task rated physically different person as doing better tend to overcompensate too much Kleck – tap into perspective taking – how “normal” people would process things if they were physically different – took pictures of the subjects and manipulated them with computer technology to place a facial scar on them Then asked subjects to answer questions What would it be like if this is what you looked like? People whose faces were scarred: no job, socially rejected, lower marriage potential Argument was we are more indifferent; not empathetic toward others Try and see things through personal perspective 14:57 14:57...
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course COM 434 taught by Professor Larrynadler during the Spring '11 term at Miami University.

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27 - this contributes to the mixed motives if you know...

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