exam 3 material

exam 3 material - classnotes The Presidency 7/25 Historical...

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class notes The Presidency 7/25 Historical development of the presidency Constitutional provisions Explicit provisions to strengthen executive Unitary executive Single individual Independently elected (not parliamentary gov) Organizationally “independent” “mid-length” term of office 4 years vaguely expressed powers (article III) “Executive power” (sec 1) “take care that the laws be faithfully executed” (sec 3) Commander in chief, make treaties, appoint ambassadors, fill vacancies (sec 2) Shared powers arrangement US presidency combines 2 roles Ceremonial head of state Chief executive officer
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Defining the presidency through practice Role of George Washington Precedent-setting presidents George Washington (1789-1797) Leader of the bureaucracy Foreign policy leader Involved in legislative relations Thomas jefferson (1801-1809) Leader of a political party Andrew Jackson (1829-1837) Spokesperson for the people and the “national” interest Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) Leader in time of national crisis (civil war) Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909) Reasserted presidential leadership in foreign affairs Led the “progressive” movement Woodrow wilson (1913-1921) Reasserted presidential leadership over Congress Franklin D Roosevelt (1933-1945) Manager of the national economy Start of the “modern presidency”
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Ronald Reagan (1980-1988) Reversed the growth of government in domestic affairs Reasserted presidential power in military and security affairs Theories of presidential power Powers not clearly fixed; flexible Depends on president’s ability and political context 3 theories Restricted theory (WH Taft) Presidents only have powers that are written out in Constitution Stewardship theory (T Roosevelt) Willing to read between the lines; interpretive view Presidents can do anything the Constitution/Congress doesn’t tell them they can’t do Prerogative theory (Lincoln) includes all All possible powers – no limit Over time, presidential power has expanded by precedent Structure of the Modern Presidency Pre-FDR organization Changes initiated by FDR Executive office of the president (EOP 1939) Umbrella organization
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Personal aides White house office (WHO) Executive office of the president Developed from Brownlow Report Expanded responsibilities of presidency creates the need for more presidential assistants & advisors Authored by Louis Brownlow Browlow on staff Staff should: Acquire info
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course POL 241 taught by Professor Chriskelly during the Summer '10 term at Miami University.

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exam 3 material - classnotes The Presidency 7/25 Historical...

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