response 5 - Chemotherapy, radiation, nausea, baldness, and...

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Chemotherapy, radiation, nausea, baldness, and depression; I went through breast cancer with my mom. “Welcome to Cancerland” was such an eye-opening article. Once my mom had been diagnosed, I felt it was impossible to get away from pink ribbons. Was breast cancer awareness “in”? From clothing to jewelry to decorations, this pink ribbon seemed to be everywhere; it was a constant reminder of my mom’s pain. Breast cancer was being prettied-up and portrayed as an “easier” cancer and one would be “lucky” to have breast cancer as opposed to “a more serious kind.” This upset me but as much as I wanted to hate this public symbol, I enjoyed the feeling of belonging. “The ultrafeminine theme of the breast-cancer ‘marketplace’ could be understood as a response to the treatments’ disastrous effects on one’s looks.” (Ehrenreich, p. 460) Skin care products and accessories are often advertised to increase awareness and contribute a percentage to a breast cancer foundation,
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This note was uploaded on 01/05/2012 for the course WOMENSTD 240 taught by Professor Cortera during the Winter '07 term at University of Michigan.

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response 5 - Chemotherapy, radiation, nausea, baldness, and...

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