Fall of Rome

Fall of Rome - The Fall of Rome and the beginning of the...

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The Fall of Rome and the beginning of the Middle Ages.
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Fall of the Roman Empire Rome was the most powerful empire the world had ever seen. Its architecture was Hellenistic and its road system was as impressive as that of the Inca in S. America
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Roman Empire at its height 117 C.E.
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Roman legal accomplishments Rome had a republican democracy sometimes Rome had a senate where patricians could represent people
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Rule of Law It means nobody is above the law, not the king, not the senate, not the people, not the police. Laws are written down and must be respected
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Rule of Law!!
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Three other examples
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Disease led to its Fall  "Realizing what a deadly disaster had come to  them, the people quickly drove the Italians  from their city. But the disease remained, and  soon death was everywhere. Fathers  abandoned their sick sons. Lawyers refused to  come and make out wills for the dying. Friars  and nuns were left to care for the sick, and  monasteries and convents were soon deserted,  as they were stricken, too. Bodies were left in  empty houses, and there was no one to give  them a Christian burial." 
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Bubonic plague “Black plague” It was called the black plague because of the dark spots found on its victims
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Coffins were rare, most were buried in mass graves!
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Why was Rome so affected by the Plague?
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Fall of Rome Rome was besieged by various tribes from modern day Germany and France.
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The Fall of the Roman Empire
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The Roman Empire at its Height The Roman Empire became huge It covered most of Europe, North Africa, and some of Asia The Empire reached its height under Emperor Diocletian (284-305 CE)
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Expansion: Good or Bad? What are some problems that an empire or country might have by being stretched out too far?
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The Decline Begins 180 CE Marcus Aurelius died His son, Commodus, took control of Rome Commodus was a poor leader, killed by his bodyguard Time of disarray follows Commodus from the movie Gladiator
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Political Problems Poor leaders weakened the government Frequent fights for power Many officials took bribes Talented people chose not to serve due to dangers of government life
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Social Problems Taxes were too great, many rich people stopped paying People stopped attending school Large number of people enslaved Plague (disease) spread throughout Rome, killing 1 in 10 Famine: There was not enough food to feed people
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Farmers lost land, unable to grow and sell crops, out of work (and famine) People bought fewer goods, shops closed Inflation occurred: Rapidly rising prices. Money lost value because fewer taxes paid. Coins lost value: Less gold put
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Fall of Rome - The Fall of Rome and the beginning of the...

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