Progressive Era Politics Summary

Progressive Era Politics Summary - Progressive Era Politics...

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Analytic Overview By 1900, America's industrial production had surpassed that of Britain, Germany, and France combined . A spate of corporate mergers from 1897 onward left the economy in the hands of a dwindling number of business conglomerates, which seemed to be growing ever wealthier and larger. In the first decade of the twentieth century, national economic output increased by 85%. 19 A quarter-century after the end of Reconstruction, it seemed that North and South had finally reunited in the interests of patriotism, white supremacy, and business opportunity. Meanwhile, blacks , Native Americans , and Chinese were increasingly excluded from the growing opportunities for wealth and freedom. Recent European immigrants went to work on the nation's railroads and in its great factories and mills. They were told to do their jobs without complaint or they would be easily replaced. The rapid growth and consolidation of industry produced a number of fissures in American life. Workers rose up to strike against the overwhelming power of their employers, demanding better wages and working conditions and disrupting national production and transportation industries. Farmers clamored for the government to redress their grievances, banding together in a Populist
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Progressive Era Politics Summary - Progressive Era Politics...

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