Postwar Suburbia

Postwar Suburbia - Postwar Suburbia In A Nutshell The...

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Postwar Suburbia In A Nutshell The modern American suburb was developed in order to meet the housing needs of millions of GIs returning from World War II . Similarly, the interstate highway system as we know it today was originally imagined as a way to assist those men in securing jobs in major city centers, while facilitating the growth of suburbs . It might sound simple, but these two twentieth-century phenomena ultimately altered the American landscape in complex ways: physically, environmentally, socially, politically, sexually, and racially. Why Should I Care? Would you believe that today far more Americans live in suburbs than in cities? In fact, if you're an American, it's more than likely that you live in a suburb. If you don't, you probably have friends or relatives that do, or you shop, go to school, work, or play there. You're certainly familiar with the suburban landscape and lifestyle in some way, even if you don't realize it. That's because for over half a century Americans—in droves—have been migrating to
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Postwar Suburbia - Postwar Suburbia In A Nutshell The...

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