Strength in Numbers

Strength in Numbers - Strength in Numbers In December 1955,...

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Strength in Numbers In December 1955, these goals motivated some 50,000 working men and women to boycott the Montgomery city buses for more than a year. For a total of 381 days, the black community of Montgomery, along with sympathetic white citizens, organized carpools, rode in taxis, and walked miles to and from their destinations to protest bus segregation laws, which required black passengers to sit in rows in the rear of the vehicle, or to stand if white passengers needed seats. Boycott leaders Jo Ann Robinson, Rosa Parks, Ralph Abernathy , and the charismatic King convinced black southerners to put their jobs and their lives on the line all for the hope of just one citywide victory. As these leaders would promise, one successful, brilliantly organized campaign to force a single southern city to reform its Jim Crow laws would be only the beginning of a massive nonviolent movement to finish what Radical Reconstruction had begun nearly a century before. A Young People's Movement Not long after the bus boycott, a younger generation of blacks became determined to get involved in the civil rights struggle. Young adults like Anne Moody
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Strength in Numbers - Strength in Numbers In December 1955,...

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