Cold War - Cold War Cuban Missile Crisis to Detente Summary Analysis The Big Picture Who What When Where(Especially Why From Confrontation to

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Cold War: Cuban Missile Crisis to Detente From Confrontation to Détente By the dawn of the 1960s, the Cold War was more than a decade old. Neither the containment doctrine of the Democratic Truman administration (1945-53) nor the "massive retaliation" policy of the Republican Eisenhower government (1953-61) had brought the United States close to victory over the Soviet Union. At the same time, neither had allowed Soviet Communists to conquer the globe, either. A tense stalemate was the order of the day. In 1960, liberal Democratic Senator John F. Kennedy ran for president as a staunch Cold Warrior, promising to escalate America's global competition with the Soviets. Taking advantage of public fears that the US might be losing the Cold War, Kennedy positioned himself to the right of Republican World War II hero Dwight Eisenhower by building his campaign around a promise to close the "missile gap" that Eisenhower had supposedly allowed the Soviets to build up. (In fact, there was no "missile gap"; the US possessed always possessed several times as many nuclear missiles as their Soviet rivals. But the fake "missile gap" issue made for good politics, and Kennedy ran with it.) Kennedy's image as a tough but idealistic foe of Communism helped him to win the 1960 election by the narrowest of margins over Eisenhower's vice president, Richard Nixon. In his inaugural address , Kennedy used soaring rhetoric to stake out a strong anticommunist position: "Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty." Kennedy asked his countrymen to support his assertive but
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Cold War - Cold War Cuban Missile Crisis to Detente Summary Analysis The Big Picture Who What When Where(Especially Why From Confrontation to

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