Tompkins - 1940). states' rights states' rights, in U.S....

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Tompkins, Daniel D. Tompkins, Daniel D., 1774–1825, American political figure, Vice President of the United States (1817–25), b. Scarsdale, N.Y. A leader of the Jeffersonian group in New York state, he was elected to Congress in 1804, but he preferred to accept an appointment to the New York supreme court. He was governor of New York from 1807 to 1817. Slavery was abolished in the state during his administration. In an effort to prevent the chartering of a banking institution in New York, he took (1812) the unique step of proroguing the legislature. He was elected Vice President in 1816 and held office through both Monroe administrations. His college essays were collected in A Columbia College Student in the Eighteenth Century (ed. by R. W. Irwin and E. L. Jacobsen,
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Unformatted text preview: 1940). states' rights states' rights, in U.S. history, doctrine based on the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, which states, The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. The term embraces both the doctrine of absolute state sovereignty that was espoused by John C. Calhoun and that of the so-called strict constructionist interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, which reserves to the state governments all powers not specifically granted by that document to the federal government. A states' rights controversy is probably inherent in the federal structure of the United States government....
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course AMH AMH2010 taught by Professor Pietrzak during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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