Classical ethology presaged an evolutionary approach to behavioral biology

Classical ethology presaged an evolutionary approach to behavioral biology

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Classical ethology presaged an evolutionary approach to behavioral biology. In the mid-20th century, a number of pioneering behavioral biologists developed the  discipline of  ethology,  the scientific study of animal behavior. In 1963, Niko Tinbergen suggested four questions that must be answered to fully  understand any behavior. What is the mechanistic basis of the behavior, including chemical, anatomical, and  physiological mechanisms? How does development of the animal, from zygote to mature individual, influence the  behavior? What is the evolutionary history of the behavior? How does the behavior contribute to survival and reproduction (fitness)? Tinbergen’s list includes both proximate and ultimate questions. The first two, which concern mechanism and development, are proximate questions, while  the second two are ultimate, or evolutionary, questions.
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BSC BSC1005 taught by Professor Orlando,rebecca during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Classical ethology presaged an evolutionary approach to behavioral biology

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