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Concept 32 - Concept 10.1 Photosynthesis converts light...

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Concept 10.1 Photosynthesis converts light energy to the chemical energy of food All green parts of a plant have chloroplasts. However, the leaves are the major site of photosynthesis for most plants. There are about half a million chloroplasts per square millimeter of leaf surface. The color of a leaf comes from  chlorophyll,  the green pigment in the chloroplasts. Chlorophyll plays an important role in the absorption of light energy during photosynthesis. Chloroplasts are found mainly in  mesophyll  cells forming the tissues in the interior of the  leaf. O 2  exits and CO 2  enters the leaf through microscopic pores called  stomata  in the leaf. Veins deliver water from the roots and carry off sugar from mesophyll cells to  nonphotosynthetic areas of the plant. A typical mesophyll cell has 30–40 chloroplasts, each about 2–4 microns by 4–7 microns  long. Each chloroplast has two membranes around a central aqueous space, the  stroma.
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