Conclusions from Mendel

Conclusions from Mendel - Conclusions from Mendel's Crosses...

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Unformatted text preview: Conclusions from Mendel's Crosses The F 1 generation showed only one character that was present in the P 1 . The other character reappeared in the F 2 (25%). The sex of the parent did not matter. The traits did not blend. Mendel concluded that the F 1 plants must contain 2 discrete factors, one for each character. The character that was seen in the F 1 is called dominant . The character not seen in the F 1 is called recessive . Letters Can Represent Genes The characteristics studied by Mendel were due to single genes. On the pair of chromosomes diagrammed below, the letter "A" represents a gene for yellow seeds. The letter "a" on the homologous chromosome represents a gene for green seeds. By convention, upper case letters are used to represent dominant genes and lower case letters are used for recessive genes. Because individuals are diploid , two letters can be used to represent the genetic makeup of an individual. In the case of seed color, the following three gene combinations are possible: AA, Aa, individual....
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Conclusions from Mendel - Conclusions from Mendel's Crosses...

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