Enzymes are substrate specific

Enzymes are substrate specific - Enzymes are substrate...

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Enzymes are substrate specific. The reactant that an enzyme acts on is the  substrate. The enzyme binds to a substrate, or substrates, forming an  enzyme-substrate complex. While the enzyme and substrate are bound, the catalytic action of the enzyme converts the  substrate to the product or products. The reaction catalyzed by each enzyme is very specific. What accounts for this molecular recognition? The specificity of an enzyme results from its three-dimensional shape. Only a portion of the enzyme binds to the substrate. The  active site  of an enzyme is typically a pocket or groove on the surface of the protein  into which the substrate fits. The active site is usually formed by only a few amino acids. The specificity of an enzyme is due to the fit between the active site and the substrate.
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Enzymes are substrate specific - Enzymes are substrate...

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