Gradients of maternal molecules in the early Drosophila embryo control axis formation

Gradients of maternal molecules in the early Drosophila embryo control axis formation

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Gradients of maternal molecules in the early  Drosophila  embryo control axis formation. Cytoplasmic determinants establish the axes of the  Drosophila  body. Substances are produced under the direction of maternal effect genes that are deposited in the  unfertilized egg. maternal effect gene  is a gene that, when mutant in the mother, results in a mutant  phenotype in the offspring, regardless of the offspring’s own genotype. In fruit fly development, maternal effect genes encode proteins or mRNA that are placed in the  egg while it is still in the ovary. When the mother has a mutation in a maternal effect gene, she makes a defective gene product  (or none at all) and her eggs will not develop properly when fertilized. Maternal effect genes are also called  egg-polarity genes  because they control the orientation  of the egg and consequently the fly.
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BSC BSC1005 taught by Professor Orlando,rebecca during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Gradients of maternal molecules in the early Drosophila embryo control axis formation

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