Most animal cells also exhibit anchorage dependence for cell division

Most animal cells also exhibit anchorage dependence for cell division

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Most animal cells also exhibit  anchorage dependence  for cell division. To divide, the cells must be anchored to a substratum, typically the extracellular matrix of a  tissue. Experiments suggest that, like cell density, anchorage is signaled to the cell cycle control  system via pathways involving plasma membrane proteins and elements of the cytoskeleton linked to them. Cancer cells exhibit neither density-dependent inhibition nor anchorage dependence. Cancer cells have escaped from cell cycle controls. Cancer cells divide excessively and invade other tissues because they are free of the body’s  control mechanisms. Cancer cells do not exhibit density-dependent inhibition when growing in culture; they do not  stop dividing when growth factors are depleted. This is because a cancer cell manufactures its own growth factors, has an abnormality in the  signaling pathway, or
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BSC BSC1005 taught by Professor Orlando,rebecca during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Most animal cells also exhibit anchorage dependence for cell division

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