One prey species may gain protection by mimicking the appearance of another prey species

One prey species may gain protection by mimicking the appearance of another prey species

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
One prey species may gain protection by mimicking the appearance of another prey species. In  Batesian mimicry  a harmless, palatable species mimics a harmful, unpalatable model. In  Müllerian mimicry,  two or more unpalatable species resemble each other. Each species gains an additional advantage because predators are more likely to  encounter an unpalatable prey and learn to avoid prey with that appearance. Predators may also use mimicry. Some snapping turtles have tongues resembling wiggling worms to lure small fish. Herbivory  is a +/− interaction in which an herbivore eats parts of a plant or alga. Herbivores include large mammals and small invertebrates. Herbivores have specialized adaptations. Many herbivorous insects have chemical sensors on their feet to recognize appropriate  food plants. Mammalian herbivores have specialized dentition and digestive systems to process  vegetation.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BSC BSC1005 taught by Professor Orlando,rebecca during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

One prey species may gain protection by mimicking the appearance of another prey species

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online