Polysaccharides - Polysaccharides, the polymers of sugars,...

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Unformatted text preview: Polysaccharides, the polymers of sugars, have storage and structural roles. Polysaccharides are polymers of hundreds to thousands of monosaccharides joined by glycosidic linkages. Some polysaccharides serve for storage and are hydrolyzed as sugars are needed. Other polysaccharides serve as building materials for the cell or the whole organism. Starch is a storage polysaccharide composed entirely of glucose monomers. Most of these monomers are joined by 14 linkages (number 1 carbon to number 4 carbon) between the glucose molecules. The simplest form of starch, amylose, is unbranched and forms a helix. Branched forms such as amylopectin are more complex. Plants store surplus glucose as starch granules within plastids, including chloroplasts, and withdraw it as needed for energy or carbon. Animals that feed on plants, especially parts rich in starch, have digestive enzymes that can...
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BSC BSC1005 taught by Professor Orlando,rebecca during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Polysaccharides - Polysaccharides, the polymers of sugars,...

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