Species richness on islands depends on island size and distance from the mainlan1

Species richness on islands depends on island size and distance from the mainlan1

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Species richness on islands depends on island size and distance from the mainland. Because of their size and isolation, islands provide excellent opportunities for studying some  of the biogeographic factors that affect the species diversity of communities. “Islands” include oceanic islands as well as habitat islands on land, such as lakes, mountain  peaks, or natural woodland fragments. An island is thus any patch surrounded by an environment unsuitable for the “island”  species. Robert MacArthur and E. O. Wilson developed a general hypothesis of island biogeography  to identify the key determinants of species diversity on an island with a given set of  physical characteristics. Imagine a newly formed oceanic island that receives colonizing species from a distant  mainland. Two factors will determine the number of species that eventually inhabit the island: The rate at which new species immigrate to the island. The rate at which species become extinct on the island.
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Species richness on islands depends on island size and distance from the mainlan1

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