The amino acid sequence of a polypeptide can be determined

The amino acid sequence of a polypeptide can be determined...

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The amino acid sequence of a polypeptide can be determined. Frederick Sanger and his colleagues at Cambridge University determined the amino acid  sequence of insulin in the 1950s. Sanger used protein-digesting enzymes and other catalysts to hydrolyze the insulin at  specific places. The fragments were then separated by a technique called chromatography. Hydrolysis by another agent broke the polypeptide at different sites, yielding a second group  of fragments. Sanger used chemical methods to determine the sequence of amino acids in the small  fragments. He then searched for overlapping regions among the pieces obtained by hydrolyzing with the  different agents. After years of effort, Sanger was able to reconstruct the complete primary structure of  insulin. Most of the steps in sequencing a polypeptide have since been automated. Protein conformation determines protein function. A functional protein consists of one or more polypeptides that have been twisted, folded,  and coiled into a unique shape. It is the order of amino acids that determines what the three-dimensional conformation of 
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2012 for the course BSC BSC1005 taught by Professor Orlando,rebecca during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The amino acid sequence of a polypeptide can be determined...

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