Wiki 1.8 - This article is about the history of Korea up to the division of Korea in 1945 For subsequent Korean history see History of North Korea

Wiki 1.8 - This article is about the history of Korea...

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This article is about the history of Korea up to the division of Korea in 1945. For subsequent Korean history, see History of North Korea and History of South Korea. Part of a series on the History of Korea Bulguksa temple, Gyeongju Prehistoric period JeulmunMumun Ancient period Gojoseon 2333 BCE–108 BCE Jin Proto–Three Kingdoms period BuyeoGoguryeoOkjeoDongyeSamhan MaByeonJin Four Commanderies of Han Three Kingdoms period Goguryeo 37 BCE–668 CE Baekje 18 BCE–660 CE Silla 57 BCE–935 CE Gaya confederacy 42–562 Northern and Southern States period Later Silla (Unified Silla) 668–935 Balhae 698–926 Later Three Kingdoms period Later Baekje 892–936 Taebong (Later Goguryeo) 901–918 Later Silla 668–935 Dynastic period Goryeo 918–1392 Joseon 1392–1897 Korean Empire 1897–1910
Colonial period Japanese rule 1910–1945 Provisional Government1919–1948 Modern period Military governments 1945–1948 North Korea 1948–present South Korea 1948–present Topics ArtDivisionLanguageMilitary (Goguryeo)MonarchsNavalScience and technology Timeline vte The Lower Paleolithic era in the Korean Peninsula and Manchuria began roughly half a million years ago. [1][2][3] The earliest known Korean pottery dates to around 8000 BC, and the Neolithic period began after 6000 BC, followed by the Bronze Age by 2000 BC,[4][5][6] and the Iron Age around 700 BC. The Korean peninsula has been inhabited for tens of thousands of years, based on the discovery of stone tools and other objects, but the connection to the Korean people today is not clear. Since the sea level was about 130 meters lower than at present from the Last Glacial Period about 100,000 years ago to about 8000 B.C., most of the East China Sea was land, but around 4000 B.C., the sea level rose to about 4000 B.C., and most of the coastline was submerged under the sea. Some studies suggest that the Korean Peninsula was briefly connected to the Japanese Archipelago during the Last Glacial Period by a land bridge formed by drifting sand in the Tsushima Strait.[7] According to Ito Toshiyuki, only about 50 Paleolithic sites before 10,000 B.C. have been discovered,[8] and the 5,000 years between 10,000 B.C. and 5,000 B.C. are blank in the chronology of the National Museum of Korea, where few sites have been found.[9][10] Nagahama Hiroaki introduces the view of Ikutaro Ito, director emeritus of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, that "Between 1969 and 1971, pottery with a pointed bottom and low round and low streamlined design was discovered in the lower layer of comb patterned earthenware from the Dongsam-dong shell mound and was named as pottery with a comb patterned design at the tip. These pottery vessels were found in Dongsam-dong, Shinam-ri site in Gyeongsangnam-do and Sopohang shell mounds in Hamgyeongbuk-do, suggesting that the oldest pottery culture was spread over a wide area. These pottery artifacts are similar to those found at the Sempuku-ji Cave site and Fukui Cave in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan." Nagahama also states that pottery from the Koshitaka site in Tsushima Island, located on the other side of the shore of Tosan-do, has been excavated 7,000 years ago, which suggests that the

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